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Rhonda Cummins Honored

Archived in the category: Announcements, General Info, Organizations
Posted by Joyce Rhyne on 17 Aug 17 - 0 Comments
Rhonda Cummins, Texas Sea Grant’s Coastal and Marine Resources Agent for Calhoun County, was recognized Tuesday, June 25, by the Texas Extension Specialists Association (TESA) with an award for Distinguished Program Achievement in Community and Resource Development. Pictured are, from left, TESA President Steven Klose, TESA Past President DeDe Jones, Cummins and Rebekka Dudensing, associate professor of agricultural economics and extension economist at Texas A&M University, who nominated Cummins for the award. (Photo courtesy Texas Sea Grant)

Rhonda Cummins, Texas Sea Grant’s Coastal and Marine Resources Agent for Calhoun County, was recognized Tuesday, June 25, by the Texas Extension Specialists Association (TESA) with an award for Distinguished Program Achievement in Community and Resource Development. Pictured are, from left, TESA President Steven Klose, TESA Past President DeDe Jones, Cummins and Rebekka Dudensing, associate professor of agricultural economics and extension economist at Texas A&M University, who nominated Cummins for the award. (Photo courtesy Texas Sea Grant)

Rhonda Cummins, the Coastal and Marine Resources Agent for Calhoun County, has been honored for her support of the community by the Texas Extension Specialists Association (TESA).

At a ceremony in San Antonio July 25 at TESA’s annual meeting, Cummins, whose position is a partnership between the Texas Sea Grant College Program, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and Calhoun County, received the Distinguished Program Achievement Award in Community and Resource Development.

“We are so very proud to see Rhonda Cummins honored by the Texas Extension Specialists Association,” said Dr. Pamela T. Plotkin, Director of Texas Sea Grant. “For many years, Rhonda’s extraordinary efforts in her county have benefited the state of Texas and the coastal and marine resources that sustain our communities and economies. She is passionate in her support of Calhoun County and deserves this recognition of her hard work.”

Cummins was nominated by Dr. Rebekka Dudensing, associate professor of agricultural economics and extension economist at Texas A&M University. Cummins has been working with Dudensing since 2014 on a project to determine the economic impact of recreational fishing in Calhoun County, particularly the effects of tournament fishing. They crafted questionnaires for tourist and tournament anglers that Cummins and volunteers administered while Dudensing tabulated spending and calculated the economic impacts. They are also working to streamline the data collection process to create an economic model for recreational fishing that might be used across the Gulf Coast.

In her nomination of Cummins, Dudensing noted other examples of Cummins’ community development work. “When she realized local children needed an assessable lending library, she built mini-libraries and placed them throughout the county. True to her Sea Grant mission, they are canoe-shaped, and each is different to inspire kids to think creatively.”

Cummins also manages a low-power radio station that broadcasts information about local points of interest, natural history and recreational opportunities, and coordinates the annual Adopt-a-Beach cleanup at Magnolia Beach and leads efforts in Calhoun County for the Monofilament Recovery and Recycling Program.
“She has truly engaged in all facets of sustainable community development — social (e.g., lending libraries and radio), environmental (e.g., Adopt-a-Beach and programs on marine pollution, rainwater harvesting, and invasive species) and economic (e.g., economic impacts of the seafood industry and recreational fishing),” Dudensing wrote.

Cummins is active in numerous professional organizations, including the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA), the ASBPA Texas Chapter Board of Directors, the San Antonio Bay Foundation Board of Directors, and the Port Lavaca Chamber of Commerce. She is a past recipient of the “Woman of the Year” award from the Port Lavaca Chamber of Commerce and was on teams that won a Superior Service Award from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension and two Sea Grant Extension Assembly Superior Outreach Planning Awards.

Texas Sea Grant is a unique partnership that unites the resources of the federal government, the State of Texas and universities across the state to create knowledge, tools, products and services that benefit the economy, the environment and the citizens of Texas. It is administered through the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and is one of 33 university-based Sea Grant Programs around the country. Texas Sea Grant is a non-academic research center in the College of Geosciences at Texas A&M University. The program’s mission is to improve the understanding, wise use and stewardship of Texas coastal and marine resources.

Island Life… by Clint Bennetsen

Archived in the category: Featured Writers, General Info, Island Life
Posted by Joyce Rhyne on 17 Aug 17 - 0 Comments

Close Calls On The Water

Greetings from the island everyone.  I hope all of you are doing well and enjoying your summer.  School starts back up the end of this month, so please be careful and on the lookout for the kiddos returning back to classes.  Good luck to all the Port O’Connor and Seadrift kids, have fun and do well.

The baby chicks and guineas are getting bigger and look like small chickens now.  Corky still hasn’t determined whether he approves of them, as I heard a commotion one day and looked out to see him chasing a white guinea that had found a hole in the fence.  Luckily the little guinea was faster and eluded the dog.  I also had a black chicken get out, and then discovered a section of their wire pen rusted away, so repairs were made.  I’ve only lost one of my entire flock of chickens and guineas, having found one of the Black Star chickens dead in the pen a few weeks ago.  Not sure what the cause was, but it happens.

I know one thing, no food scraps are going to waste out here, as those chickens will eat nearly anything, including tortillas and shrimp peels.  I’m still feeding them chick starter feed for a few more weeks, and supplementing that with whatever scraps I have or packages of tortillas that islander Vince drops off at the house.
My Fall tomato plants that I started from seeds are six weeks old now, and I just recently planted them into the ground.  It’s more difficult starting them in the summer heat, but I wanted to try and have a few fresh tomatoes for family and friends to enjoy.  Fingers crossed that they produce well.

I took Corky for his six month rattlesnake vaccine shot last week. The vaccine is supposed to help minimize the effects from a poisonous rattlesnake bite in case he gets bitten out here.  I would still take him in immediately to the vet should that ever happen, but I’m hoping the vaccine will help.  And at only $28 every six months for the vaccine shot, it is certainly worth him having it.

I might should also invest in swimming lessons for that silly dog.  While Corky and I were at a favorite island beach swimming hole that my friends and I use, he started chasing a bird, his favorite thing to do on the beach. But unlike in the surf, where the water depth very gradually increases, this spot immediately drops off deep right off the bank.  I turned just in time to see him go KERPLUNK!, and disappear underwater!  Knowing that boxers aren’t the greatest swimmers, I dropped my phone on the beach and headed towards him.  He popped up to the surface and his front legs were paddling so fast to make it back, and he did right before I got to him.  I can laugh about it now, but that crazy dog gave me a scare.

And speaking of scares, I definitely had one a few weeks ago at Clark’s dock. I ran in to pick up my best friend, Susan, to do some beach combing.  As Susan was about to release the bow line for us to head back to the island, I turned the key to start the Yamaha 150 outboard, and there was a very loud explosion, and the latched motor cowling immediately blew off the engine and went flying high into the air and landed into the harbor water.  It took me an instant to realize what was happening, and then I saw flames at the back of the motor.  I turned to check on Susan, and she, obviously being somewhat more intelligent than myself, was already off the boat and on the dock.  I’ll never forget the look on her face as she was pointing at the motor shouting, “IT’S ON FIRE!  IT’S ON FIRE!”  And she kept repeating this all day long.   I grabbed the extinguisher from the leaning post and put the flames out.  Wow!!

Unbeknownst to me, a small cut had occurred in the outboard hose fuel line, causing a tiny amount of fuel to leak and collect, along with fumes, under the enclosed cowling.   The starter apparently ignited the fumes and caused the explosion and the fire.  Myself, along with three other guys, got into the harbor water and searched for the motor cowling, but never found it.  Fellow islander, Chuckie, replaced the fuel line and let me borrow a cowling, until Britton found me a nice used one.  Thanks guys!

In closing, I want to say farewell to my brother, Delton, who is now in heaven and watching over me.  You will be missed but never forgotten.  I love you.

That’s it from the island, everyone take care and have a great day.

Letters to the Dolphin

Archived in the category: General Info, Letters to the Dolphin
Posted by Joyce Rhyne on 17 Aug 17 - 0 Comments

Thank goodness once in awhile something happens to renew your faith in your fellow man.

With everything in the news harping on all the ‘isims’ and ‘phobias’ and everyone seeming to be offended by everything these days it is easy to think people just don’t care about each other anymore. Be assured, it isn’t true.

My husband and I were on our way back to Seadrift when we had a flat tire in front of the DOW chemical plant on Hwy 185. My husband was wrestling with the lug nuts (always tightened with an air wrench in a garage, and always needing to be loosened on the road somewhere in the Texas heat with an almost useless little lug wrench that comes with your vehicle.)

As progress was slowly being made, a pickup stopped behind us and two guys immediately offered their assistance. Things went from bad to worse, and a third man showed up to help and eventually, we were on our way.

These guys made the difference between an unfortunate delay and what might have been an all day nightmare. They wouldn’t take any payment for their good deed either.

If you three guys read this, you have our sincere thanks and gratitude. You went way beyond being just good Samaritans, it was evident you really cared about helping us out of our mishap.

Thank you guys, from a couple of 70 year olds in Seadrift.

The Dolphin welcomes letters from our readers on any subject that is of general interest to our audience. Letters should be 300 words or less (with exceptions at the Dolphin’s discretion). Letters reflect the opinion of the writer, and not that of Dolphin Talk staff, and we retain the right to determine suitability for publication. It is the policy of this newspaper to promote area interests: therefore, complaints against local businesses should be directed elsewhere. Letters must be signed and include day and evening phone numbers, which will not be published. Your name will be withheld upon request, but anonymous material will not be considered for publication.
Letters to the Dolphin:
Dolphin Talk, PO Box 777
Port O’Connor, TX 77982
dolphin1@tisd.net

Picking & Grinning Jamboree

Archived in the category: Announcements, Events, General Info, Organizations
Posted by Joyce Rhyne on 17 Aug 17 - 0 Comments

Jamboree

Tickets available at the door.

Community School Supply Drive

Archived in the category: Announcements, General Info, Organizations
Posted by Joyce Rhyne on 17 Aug 17 - 0 Comments

Help out Kid’s in the Community!

On behalf of the Seadrift Chamber of Commerce, we would like to “Thank” all of those that donated to our Community School Supply Drive to help our kid’s in the community. With the your assistance, we were able to provide a bundle of school supplies to Seadrift School to kick off the new school year and welcome our new teachers.

We would like to “THANK” all of those that donated to this program and those include; G&S Excavation/Gary Reese, Karen Caraway, First United Methodist Church Seadrift, anonymous donor, and Texas Wavenet Wireless/Blair & John Kelly.

We are still accepting donations and can be made payable to the Seadrift Chamber of Commerce and can be dropped off at FNB-Seadrift and City Hall.
You can contact Kristine Metcalfe at 361 237 0406 or email at seadriftchambertx@gmail.com

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